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The Lemon Twigs: ‘A Dream Is All We Know’ review

The fifth album from the D’Addario brothers beautifully merges Beach Boys melody’s with the early experimental days of The Beatles.

The Lemon Twigs walk a thin line between acknowledging classic ‘60s songwriters and being a self-parodied pastiche of that period itself. After the success of 2023’s Everything Harmony, the New York-based band – brainchild of brothers Brian and Michael D’Addario – have wasted little time in delivering their fifth album: one revelling in joyful melodies and meticulously-crafted indie-pop songs.

 

To their credit, A Dream Is All We Know is their best and more concise effort yet. Typically, The Lemon Twigs further explore familiar reference points - this time leaning heavier on upbeat Beach Boys harmonies and early experimental, mid-60s The Beatles over the reflective Simon & Garfunkel sound of before.



In fact, this record contains a connection to The Beatles in its own right - ‘In The Eyes Of The Girl’ is co-produced by John Lennon’s son, Sean Ono Lennon. Not that you would immediately recognise this; the sixth track, instead, sounds more like The Beach Boys with its Brian Wilson-esque vocals and sublime barbershop melodies.

 

Similarly, ‘How Can I Love Her More’ is a catchy bop containing jagged keys and soppy lyrics straight out of Pets Sounds template; as does the joyful ‘Sweet Vibration’ (even if the “La la la la” bridge vocals are too sickly to stomach). Elsewhere, ‘Church Bells’ is as captivating a track on the album featuring frenetic acoustic solos, horns and Rubber Soul-era echoing.

 

And the quality is maintained to the bitter end. Penultimate track ‘I Should’ve Known Right From The Start’ is a nostalgic slice of high-pitched folk, wonderfully contrasting to closer ‘Rock On (Over and Over)’ and its nod to the ‘50s rock ‘n’ roll of Chuck Berry. Overall though, A Dream Is All We Know is a multi-layered nostalgic pop record with immaculate summer vibes. A blissful ode to the past by two extremely talented brothers.

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